OPEN Research Support
head

Professor
Anders Green
OPEN Odense Patient data Explorative Network, Odense University Hospital


Projekt styring
Projekt status    Sampling ongoing
 
Data indsamlingsdatoer
Start 31.03.2014  
Slut 31.12.2019  
 



Diabetes Impact Study 2013

Short summary

The project aims to characterize the epidemiological dynamics and trends of diabetes in Denmark in the period 2000-2011 (incl.). In addition, to use historical data to estimate future scenarios in diabetes, provided that investments in prevention and treatment are made. In addition, the study will shed light on the economic and socio-economic impact of diabetes, both at individual and at society level, providing knowledge of importance for the capacity-building and prioritization in diabetes care.


Rationale

With currently more than 300 million patients worldwide, diabetes mellitus is one of the most burdensome chronic diseases. The disease often leads to serious comorbidities and complications such as eye disease, renal disease neuropathy and cardiovascular diseases. Recently, diabetes has also been associated with the development of mental diseases such as depression and dementia.

Therefore, diabetes is associated with reduced quality of life and reduced life expectancy, with a corresponding strain on the healthcare systems worldwide. Diabetes is also found to reduce the number of productive years in the labour market as well as to reduce productivity while in the labour force.

The Danish National Diabetes Register was established in 2006 and covers supposedly all Danish citizens with a diagnosis of diabetes from 1996 through 2012 which is the last year of data before the register was closed. When linked with patient-specific data in the Danish National Patient Register and the Danish Civil Registration System, the National Diabetes Register offers unique opportunities for investigations into the epidemiological, public health and health economics aspects of diabetes in the Danish society

The project aims to characterize the epidemiological dynamics and trends of diabetes in Denmark in the period 2000-2011 (incl.). In addition, to use historical data to estimate future scenarios in diabetes, provided that investments in prevention and treatment are made. In addition, the study will shed light on the economic and socio-economic impact of diabetes, both at individual and at society level, providing knowledge of importance for the capacity-building and prioritization in diabetes care.


Description of the cohort

The cohort comprises all registrants in the Danish National Diabetes Register who were alive at January 1, 2000 with a previous inclusion in the register and with an inclusion from January 1, 2000 through December 31, 2011. For each registrant, data are obtained from the Danish National Patient Register and the Danish Civil Registration System.


Data and biological material

See 'Description of the cohort'.


Collaborating researchers and departments

In addition to OPEN, the following organizations are collaborating in the project:

Institute of Applied Economics and Health Research (ApEHR)

Danish Diabetes Association

Centre of Health Economics Research (COHERE); University of Southern Denmark

Publications associated with the project

Validation of the Danish National Diabetes Registry; Green A, Sortsø C, Jensen PB, Emneus M; Clin Epidemiol 7: 5-15, 2015. DOI: 10.2147/CLEP.S72768

Incidence, morbidity, mortality and prevalence of diabetes in Denmark, 2000-2011: results from the Diabetes Impact Study 2013; Green A, Sortsø C, Jensen PB, Emneus; Clin Epidemiol 7: 421-430, 2015. DOI: 10.2147/CLEP.S88577

Societal costs of diabetes mellitus in Denmark; Sortsø C, Green A, Jensen PB, Emneus M; Diabetic Medicine 00: 000-000, 2015. DOI: 10.1111/dme.12965

Societal costs of diabetes mellitus 2025 and 2040 - forecasts based on real world cost evidence and observed epidemiological trends in Denmark; Sortsø C, Emneus M, Green A, Jensen PB, Eriksson T; Modern Economy 6: 1150-1166, 2015. DOI: 10.4236/me.2015.610109

Socioeconomics inequality of diabetes patients' health care utilization in Denmark; Sortsø C, Lauridsen J, Emneus M, Green A, Jensen PB; Health Economics Review (awaiting link)